PHYSIOLOGY AND VEGETATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF 'BLACK MAGIC' GRAPEVINES IN RESPONSE TO DIFFERENT ROOTSTOCKS

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Authors

  • Ali Sabir Selcuk University Agriculture Faculty Horticulture Department, Konya, Türkiye
  • Nazmiye Dorum Selcuk University Agriculture Faculty Horticulture Department, Konya, Türkiye

Keywords:

Vitis vinifera L., viticulture, rootstock, grafting, scion cultivar

Abstract

The grape cultivars and rootstock show great variation in terms of physiology and vegetative development. Response of grapevines to environmental conditions has been affected by various factors such as the rootstocks used in grafting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the rootstock effects on the vegetative growth and physiology of ‘Black Magic’ (BM) by comparing the grafted vines with ungrafted cultivar in calcareous soil under continental climate condition. The results showed that all the physiological and growth parameters evaluated in the study displayed great variations. Stomatal conductance and leaf temperature of the scion was obviously decreased by the rootstocks 44-53 M and R. du Lot. Shoot length was remarkably greater in BM/41 B grafting than other rootstocks or grafting combinations. Shoot length, leaf number and leaf area of the scion were higher on rootstocks (except for leaf area of BM/R. du Lot) than its own rooted vine. Rootstocks had significant promotion on the development of ‘Black Magic’ grown in calcareous soil under continental climate condition. 41 B displayed higher contributions to many growth parameters of the scion under this condition and thus appeared to be preferable one among them according to these preliminary investigations.

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Published

2023-12-28

How to Cite

Sabir, A., & Dorum, N. (2023). PHYSIOLOGY AND VEGETATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF ’BLACK MAGIC’ GRAPEVINES IN RESPONSE TO DIFFERENT ROOTSTOCKS . International Journal of Agricultural and Natural Sciences, 16(3), 294–302. Retrieved from https://ijans.org/index.php/ijans/article/view/761

Issue

Section

Research Articles

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